Management Concepts: Reality Or Myth

Management concepts always fascinated me. I always envied the MBA grads until I completed my Executive MBA. I went through a lot of case studies and concepts, which were based on the actions or activities performed by the organizations due to which they were successful. Many a times I found out those companies who out performed faded out in the long run. I was skeptical about the studies, which were made and the publications, which glorified their existence. When I wanted to make a point I could not rely on the studies that was published to justify management concepts. I consoled myself that a lot of activities and decisions that are made can give success and may be in the long run few decisions can matter in terms of defining the existence. The activity and decision, which gave the company, the cutting edge may be kept aside and not mixed up with the overall failure of the organization in the long run.

As we all know, success and failure depend upon a lot of factors and sometimes are out of the reach of the executives who take decision for the organization. The organization can have a great strategy and the strategy could be followed extremely well but still success can be something more than the strategy because an organization without a strategy can also become successful. Product differentiation, value proposition and cutting edge technology may give you a position in the market place, but may not be sufficient enough to become successful in the market place. I was fascinated by the quote provided by the representative of one of the venture capital organization who said that the companies are successful because they resolved their problems better than their competitors. It is as simple as that. An example of organization’s success is not enough if the other organizations just imitate because the result has many contexts, which may not suit to the organization that is imitating.

I always thought of starting my own organization and a dear friend of mine told me that 20% of organizations only succeed. I thought that was a great encouragement. There were many organizations that made profit after 10 years of existence. It always made an impression in my mind and made the perspective of business when the long-term was always the first priority. The organization may be doing great for the time being, but it’s existence will only depict when it sustains its success for a longer period of time otherwise the success looses it’s value. Every organization wants to be a success, but the only aspect is to take the right approach the right time at the right place. I do not believe in luck rather I believe in hard work. I believe in the solution that suits the long-term survival of the organization. I believe in the road map and do not believe in imitating successful organizations’ strategy.

This makes me harder to do a case study to define the management concepts. May be I will define the concept based on the success story now and contradict it in the future. That is the reason why the concepts change so rapidly and everybody wants to know the latest management concept. Nobody can see the future and can predict the result of the action or decision that will bring in future. That is why I am very safe if I imitate the successful strategy.

Change Management Concepts – The Leader As Teacher

Introduction
This is the first in a series of Change Management Concepts articles.

Change Management is about introducing some combination of new people, new processes and new technology to a business or organization. The organization has a lot to learn, and someone needs to be the teacher.

Often executives will hire consultants to drive their change management initiatives, and the teaching job falls to the consultants almost by default. Save some money. Hire consultants if you need them, but focus their teaching efforts on your leadership team. Then let the leaders (yourself included) teach everyone else.

Leaders Are The Best Teachers
When a management consulting firm conducted a study a few years ago, they formed two groups of people to be trained in new systems and processes. One group was trained by professional trainers. For the second group, the professionals trained the boss and the boss trained the people. Immediately after training, both groups were tested to determine how well they had learned. 

Which group tested higher? Well, um, uh, well, it was the professionally trained group.

Wait a minute, there’s more. The same testing was conducted six months later. Guess what? The retention of the material was much higher for the group trained by their own boss.

If you think about it, neither result should surprise you. Unless a boss is a very gifted teacher, he or she won’t be as effective as a professional trainer. The professional trainer, however, won’t be hanging around when the formal training ends. The boss can reinforce the training materials, and can ensure they are applied on the job.

Teaching, and specifically leader led teaching, is an important and often overlooked change management concept.

You Can Do It
First of all, if you are in a leadership position, you are already a teacher. Every day you’re guiding people in the expectation that they will think for themselves and apply your guidance in their jobs. (If you’re telling them what to do, you’re not a leader — more like a supervisor).
Granted, there’s a difference between day to day guidance and formal teaching. Even if you’re not a great speaker or don’t enjoy the formal classroom setting, just think about some of your qualifications:

You know the subject matter
You know the students
You have a vested interest in their success
You have a passion for what you’re going to teach (hopefully!)
These are advantages that are going to outweigh any limitations you have as a result of not being a trained instructor. 

Some Tips to Help You Succeed as a Teacher
Commit the Time – When you’re teaching your staff, you have the luxury of spreading the training out, perhaps 2 hours per day for a week instead of a dedicated day and a half. Go for it, but whatever time on whatever days you schedule for training, stick to it. Don’t cancel, and don’t allow interruptions to the training schedule.

Teach, Don’t Preach – Your goal is to share information and enable people to apply it. Help people understand what’s in it for them as you address what’s changing.

Ask Questions – It’s a great way to test understanding, for you and your students.

Invite Dialogue – That’s what asking questions will do. Your job gets easier when the students are discussing what’s being taught. You just have to step in when they get stuck.

Repetition – Change management concepts need to be repeated in order to be absorbed. In other words, change management concepts need to be repeated in order to be absorbed. Enough said.

Practice Ego Sacrifice – You are not a professional instructor, and you may find you’re struggling with teaching certain things like technical concepts. Remember that it’s the long term results that make you the right choice for this particular job, and be willing to let your students know that you need their help at times.

Maximize Your Management Concept Training Course For Higher Work Effectiveness

A management concept training course, when applied correctly, can help to boost your company’s production and work effectiveness. When you apply the concepts that are taught in the course and are consistent, you will notice an exponential increase in efficiency in regards to personnel and operations. While there are many different types of management concept training courses available, only a handful are on a level where they can be properly utilized on an organizational level. These five tips will help you maximize and hone the skills that you learn in a management concept training course.

1. Use your Notes

All too often people sign up for training courses and skills enhancement courses and when they walk out the door they leave a good percentage of what they learned behind them. Studies show that people only retain a small percentage, in the neighborhood of 24%, of information that they are told or taught – unless they write it down. Take notes and USE THEM! Refer to them often, transcribe them to share with coworkers and apply what you learned to real life situations.

2. Have Regular Staff Development Meetings

Having regular staff development meetings where you reiterate and expand upon the material you covered at your management concept training course will help to make it a part of your organization. As you work on your skills, developing them and honing them, you are applying them to real life situations. Additionally, you are working with others in the applications of the principles taught.

3. Create a Focus Group

Create a focus group with a good, diverse team to bounce ideas off of each other. Discuss the principles that you learned, use your notes from the course and talk about ways to realistically apply the principles to your own organization. Explore creative applications for the skills and teach the other members of the focus group the skills you learned in your management concept training course.

4. Ask Questions

Ask questions and get feedback about how the principles and skills are working in your organization. Don’t, however, contain your quest for feedback solely to upper management. Ask lower level employees. They are often on the front lines, dealing directly with customers, product and operations so their feedback and suggestions could prove to be invaluable.

5. Keep on Learning

Don’t limit yourself to just one management concept training course, keep on learning! Take other courses that are related to your topic and look for courses that build on your existing skills, particularly those that you learned through your initial management concept training course. Never stop learning, update your skills, abilities and knowledge regularly.

When you attend a management concept training course, you can bring to your organization and position. There are even more ways that you can help your managers increase their effectiveness at work, never stop exploring.